Roman Coins

Roman Coins

Coinage was introduced by the Roman Republican government in circa 300 BC, “surprisingly late” in southern European terms; the Greek world had already been using coinage over the previous three centuries. The Greek colonies in southern Italy had been using coins for most of this time, and this technology had also been adopted by a number of other Italian cities, such as Naples, Taranto, Velia, Heraclea, Metapontum, Thurii and Croton, who produced them in large quantities during the 4th century BC to pay for their wars against the inland Italian groups encroaching on their territory. For these reasons, the Romans would have certainly known about coinage systems long before their government actually introduced them. By the time that they introduced a system of coinage, the Roman state had become a dominant force in the western Mediterranean, having defeated Carthage during the Second Punic War of 218–201 BC. The government’s reasons behind adopting coins might have been cultural, in that they wanted to adopt a Greek institution at a time when Roman society was increasingly coming under the cultural influence of the Hellenic world.

Roman Coin Severus Alexander (AD 218-222) AR denarius

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ancient roman coin Follis 3,41gm 19mm As Found In Perfect Shape

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Ancient Roman Coin. #8 NO RESERVE

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Ancient Roman Coin. #4 NO RESERVE

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ANCIENT ROMAN COIN - Unique Lot P31907

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Ancient Roman Coin- Valens-SCARCE!!!!

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Ancient Roman Coin. #6 NO RESERVE

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Ancient Roman Coin- Valens-RIC IX 24b

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ancient roman coin Sestertius 23,66gm 31mm In Very Good Shape

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Ancient Roman Coin. #5 NO RESERVE

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Ancient Roman Coin. #9 NO RESERVE

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Ancient Roman Coin. #7 NO RESERVE

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ancient roman coin 2,90gm 19mm

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Caracalla 198 - 217 AD Silver Denarius Ancient Roman Coin Liberty #AC032

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ANCIENT SILVER ROMAN COIN

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Ancient Roman Coin Necklace Pendant Jewelry Genuine Ancient Rom

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Shekel of Tyros Coin, Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver, Roman Coin *(1 Coin)* (87-S)

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The type of Roman coins that Rome introduced was unlike that found elsewhere in the ancient Mediterranean, combining a number of “unusual elements”. One of these early types of Roman coins was the large bronze bars that are now known as aes signatum or ‘struck bronze’. These bars measured about 160 by 90 millimetres (6.3 by 3.5 in) and weighed around 1,500 to 1,600 grams (53 to 56 oz), being made out of a highly leaded tin bronze. Although similar metal currency bars had been produced in Italy, and in particular in northern Etruscan areas, these had been made of an unrefined metal with a high iron content, known as Aes grave.

Along with the aes signatum, the Roman state also issued a series of bronze and silver circular Roman coins that emulated the styles of those produced in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. Produced using the manner of manufacture then utilised in the Greek colony of Naples, the designs of these early coins were also heavily influenced by Greek designs. The designs on the coinage of the Republican period displayed a “solid conservatism”, usually illustrating mythical scenes or personifications of various gods and goddesses.

Byzantine Coins

Byzantine currency, money used in the Eastern Roman Empire after the fall of the West, consisted of mainly two types of coins: the gold solidus and a variety of clearly valued bronze coins. By the end of the empire the currency was issued only in silver stavrata and minor copper coins with no gold issue.

Early Byzantine coins continue the late Roman conventions: on the obverse the head of the Emperor, now full face rather than in profile, and on the reverse, usually a Christian symbol such as the cross, or a Victory or an angel (the two tending to merge into one another). The gold coins of Justinian II departed from these stable conventions by putting a bust of Christ on the obverse, and a half or full-length portrait of the Emperor on the reverse. These innovations incidentally had the effect of leading the Islamic Caliph Abd al-Malik, who had previously copied Byzantine styles but replacing Christian symbols with Islamic equivalents, finally to develop a distinctive Islamic style, with only lettering on both sides. This was then used on nearly all Islamic coinage until the modern period.